Richard Connell, "The Most Dangerous Game"
Lesson plans and teaching resources

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"The Most Dangerous Game" eNotes Response Journal
Each Response Journal includes a rich variety of writing prompts: some will take students directly into the text, while others will give students an opportunity to express their thoughts and feelings and to reflect on their own experiences.

Comparing Characters Across Two Short Stories
Students compare and contrast characters and/or settings from "The Most Dangerous Game" and Jack London's "To Build a Fire." The lesson includes a link to the London story. Adobe Reader required for access.

New 8/23Five-day lesson plan for teaching "The Most Dangerous Game" to ninth graders
Anticipation guide (scroll to the bottom), five lessons with emphasis on vivid language, atmosphere or mood, character analysis, story maps. Includes daily assessments.

"The Most Dangerous Game"
Links to worksheets, vocabulary practice, and online versions of the story.

New 8/23"The Most Dangerous Game"
This packet includes anticipation guide, text of the story with reading support, post-reading questions, writing task, oral presentation activity. 27 pages; Adobe Reader required.

"The Most Dangerous Game"
Four vocabulary games.

"The Most Dangerous Game"
Text of the story.

"The Most Dangerous Game" vocabulary
60 words presented in context and with definitions. Click on a word for pronunciation, synonyms, examples of use, more.

The Most Dangerous Murder Trial
Students will make inferences and apply listening skills as they role-play a trial of the main character. This lesson is designed for 9th grade.



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