Jack London
Lesson plans for The Call of the Wild and other works

|Biography| |The Call of the Wild| |"To Build a Fire"| |White Fang| |Other Stories|

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Biography and Background

The Jack London Collection
Extensive site, including biography, images, e-texts, advice for teachers, help for students.

The World of Jack London
Links to a wide variety of biographical information.

The Life of Jack London as Reflected in his Works
Extensive biography.

Sled Dogs of the Arctic Circle
This downloadable video (7:17) explores the strength and social structure of sled dogs and the role of the dogs in Inuit society. Scroll down for discussion questions and a transcript.

The Call of the Wild

The Call of the Wild
With a focus on a theme of survival in the wild, this site offers theme openers, crosscurricular activities, research assignments, and suggestions for related reading.

The Call of the Wild
Vocabulary, chapter-by-chapter reading questions and writing topics.

The Call of the Wild
Resources here include an extensive list of vocabulary words divided by chapter, two quizzes, related math questions, and an alternate ending.

The Call of the Wild
Chapter-by-chapter study questions and answers. Requires Adobe Reader or compatible application for access.

Showing Some Creative Problem Solving
Students will read an excerpt from The Call of the Wild, focusing on the character of Buck solving a problem, listening carefully to London's word choice. Students will think of their own animals with original problems to be solved. Students will then create a 3-paragraph story, detailing a problem and the eventual solution with words. This lesson focuses on idea development and word choice.

Study Guide for The Call of the Wild
Biography, background information, vocabulary, and a variety of reading and writing activities. Requires Adobe Reader or compatible application for access.

A Teacher's Guide for The Call of the Wild
This 17-page document includes background information, prereading activities, discussion questions, vocabulary, activities, and suggestions for extended learning. A guide to "To Build a Fire" begins on page 14. Requires Adobe Reader or compatible application for access.

Vocabulary from The Call of the Wild:

Words are presented in context and with definitions. Click on a word for pronunciation, synonyms, more.

"To Build a Fire"

Comparing Characters Across Two Short Stories
Students compare and contrast characters and/or settings from Richard Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game" and London's "To Build a Fire." The lesson includes a link to the London story. Adobe Reader required for access.

Crane, London, and Literary Naturalism
Students use Crane's "The Open Boat" and Jack London's "To Build a Fire" to explore the key characteristics of American literary naturalism.

Knowledge or Instinct? Jack London's "To Build a Fire"
Students examine the relationship of man and nature, discuss London's juxtaposition of knowledge and instinct, understand third person omniscient point of view, and conduct in-depth character analysis.

"To Build a Fire"
Introduction and text of the story, available in both PDF and Google Docs formats.

White Fang

Investigating Jack London's White Fang: Nature and Culture Detectives
Students explore images from the Klondike and read the novel closely to learn how to define and differentiate the terms nature and culture.

White Fang
Online text.

White Fang
Text in multiple formats, including HTML, ePub, and plain text.

White Fang
Background information, discussion questions and classroom activities. Three pages, Adobe Reader required for access.

White Fang Activity Book
Support activities organized by chapter with emphasis on reading comprehension and language skills. Adobe Reader required, 25 pages.

White Fang Study Guide questions
Post-reading questions organized by chapter. Nine pages, Adobe Reader required for access.

Other Stories

"The Shadow and the Flash"
Text of the story.

"War"
Introduction and text of the story, available in both PDF and Google Docs formats. The story has an ironic ending that might pair well with Ambrose Bierce's "A Horseman in the Sky."