William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet
Lesson plans and other teaching resources

For introductory, background and other resources, try Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Age. For links to other plays, try the Shakespeare Main Page.

Sponsored Link

Romeo and Juliet E-Notes Curriculum Plan
Daily lesson plans covering an entire unit, with activities, vocabulary, and assessments. Also available: puzzle pack, response journal, AP teaching unit, activity pack, lesson plans.

17th Century Pick Up Lines: "Your words like musick please me"
Students will examine a chapter from a mid-17th century handbook, The Mysteries of Love & Eloquence, Or the Arts of Wooing and Complementing, which offers to "young practioners [sic] of Love and Courtship set forms of expressions for imitation." Designed for prereading, this activity encourages students to become comfortable with 17th century language and to look as language as a tool of persuasion.

17th Century Rules of Marriage
Students compare the attitudes of Shakespeare's day with those of Lord Capulet and Friar Laurence. This project is designed for use after reading the play.

A Close Reading of Shakespeare on Your Feet
After introductory discussion and viewing a video (link included), students combine close reading with acting by "physicalizing" the text. This lesson uses the Nurse's speech from Romeo and Juliet and Petruchio's greeting to Kate from The Taming of the Shrew, and it can be adapted for other scenes, as well.

Crash Course, English Literature:

Author John Green discusses central issues from Romeo and Juliet in these engaging (downloadable) videos at YouTube.

Double Teen Death Horror
On this page, a tabloid-style summary of the play from the BBC. Follow links to learn how your students can produce something similar.

English Class in Performance
If you want your students to get up and perform Shakespeare, here are some abridged scripts: The Merchant of Venice, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, and The Tempest.

Figurative Language Alive: Balcony Scene Charades
This lesson plan is intended for a middle school group that will learn how Shakespeare uses figurative language and abstract comparison in the famous balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet. To this end, students will play figurative language charades with 10 lines from the scene. The goal is to make figurative language more accessible to students and to help them visualize and identify specific figures of speech.

Gangs Throughout Literature
This WebQuest asks students to analyze the impact of gangs and to explore conflict resolution strategies. It uses both Romeo and Juliet and the Hatfields and the McCoys as sources.

Green Eggs and Iambs from Mrs. G's Internet Adventures
Dr. Seuss meets the Bard, and students investigate the power of rhythm.

"Here's much to do with hate, but more with love": The Prologue in Romeo and Juliet
Part of the fun of teaching Romeo and Juliet is letting students see how the play is about much more than romantic love. In this lesson, students will work in pairs on a guided close reading of the prologue. Once students understand how the prologue functions in the play, they will try writing a prologue sonnet to another piece of literature they have read.

The Interactive Folio: Romeo and Juliet
On the left, hyperlinked text of the play. Click on a link, and multimedia support appears on the right -- definitions, graphics, sometimes a video. Many thanks to the Canadian Adaptations of Shakespeare for this resource!

Juliet Trumps Laura: Shakespeare and the Petrarchan Sonnet
A lesson for just after Act I, with emphasis on the idealized woman.

Additional Romeo and Juliet lesson plans >> | 1 | 2 | 3 |