Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst
Lesson plans and teaching resources

|Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day| |Other books by Viorst|

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Seven sets of discussion questions based on different incidents in the book.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Students identify cause and effect relationships. Lesson includes background knowledge and vocabulary. Follow tabs to charts, worksheet. Designed for grade 2.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
4 printable coloring pages.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
After listening to the story, students write, draw, and/or rap about a bad day of their own. Includes pre-reading activity.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Pre-reading activity and several cross-curricular postreading learning activities. Designed for whole-language classroom. Word processor required for access.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Discussion questions, cross-curricular learning activities, printables including practice with antonyms, and related web sites. These resources were designed to support a theatrical production, but many will translate to reading, too. 6 pages; Adobe Reader required for access.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Five postreading learning activities, including a creative writing prompt. Word processor required to access each activity.

Between Repeated Catch Phrases
Judith Viorstís story focuses on the chronological organization of a very bad day in Alexanderís life. It begins with Alexanderís morning and ends with his bedtime. Viorst weaves a catch phrase (the one about moving to Australia) throughout the story as well—another element of good organization. This writing lesson has students write chronologically about a bad "school picture" day using a strong introduction and conclusion, while weaving an original catch phrase in between the story's details.

Family Support Network
Students dramatize how family members can support those who are having a bad day.

A Good Day
After listening to the story, students write lists of things that happen to them on bad days and things that might happen on good days. This lesson is designed for kindergarten to third grade.

My Bad Day
Students will use the writing process to create an original writing sample. Students will write a fictional story reflecting personal experiences.

Other Books by Viorst

Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday
Comprehension questions focusing on economic concepts of saving, economic wants, scarcity, goods and services, and investing.

Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday
Students practice noting details. Includes text-dependent questions, vocabulary words, a culminating task, and additional learning activities. This unit plan is designed to last 4 days. 8 pages; word processor required.

Writing task for Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday
Includes prompt, graphic organizer, student handout, and a model essay. Emphasis is on using evidence to support an inference. 6 pages; word processor required for access.

Since Hannah Moved Away
Students note details as they read. Includes text-dependent questions, vocabulary words, a culminating task, and additional learning activities. Word processor required for access.

Judith Viorst
Brief biography and links to these poems: "Fifteen, Maybe Sixteen Things to Worry About," "Learning," "Mother Doesn't Want a Dog," "Since Hannah Moved Away," and "Some Things Don't Make Any Sense at All."

Writing Poetry like Pros
This extensive set of lessons includes an activity using Viorst's "Fifteen, maybe Sixteen Things to Worry About" in Lesson 2, Group 5.



StoryboardThat.com Free Trial offer

America in Class Webinars

Teacher's Pet